Spanakopasta

Spanakopasta

A deliciously quick and simple way to enjoy the flavours of spanakopita

Spanakopasta

 

Ask any non-Greek, or Greek, what one of their favourite Greek foods is, and you will often hear spanakopita.  There’s a very good reason for that!  Spanakopita, in all of its variations is a delicious treat; perfect as a meze, and at the same time substantial enough for a light meal.  The problem (if you are really trying hard to find one) is that spanakopita is encased in phyllo, which you either may not have on hand (if you are opting for the store bought variety) or which you may not have time to make (if you are going for the do-it-yourself variety).  Alas, every problem has a solution, and in this case the solution is pasta.

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Black-eyed peas and spinach (Φασόλια μαυρομάτικα με σπανάκι)

Black-eyed peas and spinach (Φασόλια μαυρομάτικα με σπανάκι)

Black-eyed peas and spinach

We know, we know, we have probably already told you that some other dish we have previously written about is our absolute favourite…but here we go again!  Black-eyed peas and spinach is our true absolute favourite food (until the next favourite comes along that is).

We believe that black-eyed peas (also called cowpeas) are the Queen of Legumes, and apparently we are not alone.  They are awesome enough to have a music band named after them, to be the conduit with which to poison an abusive husband named Earl in the Dixie Chicks hit, “Goodbye Earl” (we do not condone murder by the way) and to have a franchise restaurant in Texas and Tennessee named after them. The restaurant, of course, serves black-eyed peas.  We don’t think any other legume has received as much popular attention.  There must be something to these little gems.

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Spanakorizo (Σπανακόρυζο)

Spanakorizo (Σπανακόρυζο)

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If we were to assign a relationship status to each of our parents’ recipes, the one for spanakorizo would definitely read “it’s complicated”.  You see, as children, we hated this dish almost as much as we love it now.  And we didn’t just, not like it…no.  The mention of spanakorizo for supper, or the smell of it cooking for lunch, elicited a physical response which included gagging and waves of nausea.  The upside is that our visceral dislike for spanakorizo did support sibling connectedness, as we all worked together to rid ourselves of the vile meal without actually having to consume much of it.  Many a times, a diversion was created, just enough of a distraction to allow us to wrap some of the spanakorizo in a paper towel and toss it in the trash.  Our poor parents.  We don’t think they ever caught on.

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