Diples (Δίπλες)

Diples (Δίπλες)
Diples (Δίπλες)

Summer is coming, and with it, wedding season.  We love everything about weddings; the blissful couple, the beautiful dress, the personal touches which permeate the entire event.  There is so much to appreciate!  What we love most however are the traditions. Whether they are cultural or religious or simply familial, these traditions situate the nuptials within something larger than the day itself.  How lovely!

Within our family, and Greek culture, we have our own set of traditions.  Some of these, of course, revolve around food.  In the Messinia region of the Peloponnese, which is where our parents and grandparents (and great-grand parents) are from, one of these sweet traditions is diples. Offering diples at weddings represents a wish that as two individuals become one couple and one family, their joys and blessings double. 

Read more

Warm feta packages

Warm feta packages, with tomatoes and olives

Warm feta packages

We love food; we love to eat food, write about food and talk about food.  It must run in the family, because we have recently (like right now) been enjoying a visit from our Australian cousin.  Along with showing off our beautiful city,  hanging out with all of our cousins, and hearing about the perils of living down under (we have decided that Aussies are much braver than us Canadians!),  we have found ourselves constantly talking about food…possibly because we are always eating.  We have been having a truly beautiful time.

Read more

Lalagia (Λαλάγγια)

img_2562

Lalagia (Λαλάγγια)

For many families, Christmas brings special traditions and special recipes. Whether it is pannetone, fruitcake, plum pudding, or tourtières, what makes these limited edition foods extra meaningful is that they are often only made during the holidays; a time of gatherings, joy and celebration. In our family, the traditional Christmas Eve treat is lalagia; savory, oval shaped rings of fried dough. I know, I know….we had you at fried dough.  For our parents, making lalagia brings them back to their own childhoods. On the day before Christmas, the women in the villages where they grew up would gather to prepare this special, highly anticipated treat.

We realize that many of you (even Greeks) will have never heard of lalagia. Or maybe you have had something similar, which goes by a different name.  Our parents are both from the Messinia region of the Peloponnese where lalagia are extremely popular and considered a local specialty. Yet, even within this region of Greece, they are not found everywhere.  Traditions, customs, and of course recipes, vary from village to village and from family to family.

Although especially common during Christmas, when folklore claims that they ward off evil elves and evil spirits, across Messinia lalagia are available in bakeries year-round.  In fact, during the summer in Kalamata there are vendors who sell their freshly made lalagia right on the beach.  Sigh.   So, if you are unfamiliar with lalagia, this is the year to make their acquaintance. Trust us. You’ll be happy you did.

Read More